Tag Archives: seeds

Day 154 – From Seed to Plant

For June 2, we read another book from that prolific purveyor of “infotainment”: Gail Gibbons. “From Seed to Plant” was actually left over from our May theme of seeds and planting – but better late than never! Today’s selection, in true Gail Gibbons fashion, is full of colorful and informative illustrations that help to explain a real-life subject in an engaging way that pulls little listeners right in.

seed to plantIn “From Seed to Plant”, Ms. Gibbons introduces readers to a wide variety of seeds and to some of the flowers that grow from those seeds. There are informative drawings of plant anatomy and examples of the different and innovative ways in which seeds have adapted in order to travel from their source – such as being carried by squirrels, attaching themselves to someone’s pant leg, or floating on the wind. Aspiring gardeners will be inspired by Ms. Gibbon’s explanation of how seeds sprout into new plants, and her “From Seed to Plant” project for growing your own bean plant.

Once again, we turned to Ms. Gibbons for an entertaining and educational “real-world” picture book, and once again she came through with flying colors! Thank you, Ms. Gibbons.

Day 135 – A Seed is Sleepy

As part of our May focus on flowers, seeds, and gardening, today we read a fantastic reality-based picture book by Dianna Hutts Aston and Sylvia Long: “A Seed is Sleepy”. Like their collaboration on “An Egg is Quiet”, “A Seed is Sleepy” is a true work of art, blending poetic text with vibrant and detailed watercolor illustrations to introduce younger listeners to the world of seeds – where they come from, their many different shapes and sizes, and the remarkable ways in which they ensure that they will grow into the plants they are meant to become.

sleepyAlmost every page of the book ascribes a human characteristic to seeds, and uses that characteristic to help explain a seed’s journey. It’s an engaging and clever approach. A seed is secretive because it does not reveal itself too quickly, a seed is adventurous because it must strike out on its own in search of a less crowded place to put down roots, and a seed is generous because it gives the baby plant a seed coat to keep it warm, etc. The flowing cursive font and the pictures work together to enhance the poetic feeling of the book. On each page you can also find short paragraphs of additional information, in smaller block lettering, placed between the illustrations – and each of the seeds or plants shown are labeled in the same font for easy identification – not unlike a handwritten and lovingly prepared field guide.

I love how this book introduces children to all the different things that a seed can be, or the different ways they can behave, in such an artistic and engaging way. I also appreciated the little nuggets of information, including an anecdote about the oldest known seed to actually sprout: a date palm seed found in the remains of an ancient palace in Israel. The book is a wonderful combination of fact and art. There is a bit of a magical quality to it as well – which fits with the magical fact that a single seed has everything necessary to grow into a giant tree, all packed inside a tiny seed coat. While the cursive font may be challenging for some younger readers to follow on their own, they should still have fun picking this book up just to examine Ms. Long’s illustrations – I certainly enjoyed looking back over it again as I was writing this review.


Day 132 – Planting a Rainbow

If you have been following us you may have noticed that we are running a little bit behind on our book reviews…but bear with us – we have plenty of reviews yet to post and we will eventually get caught up…some time before the end of the summer! So – where was I? Ah, here we go…
In keeping with our “May Flowers” theme, on May 11 we read “Planting a Rainbow” by Lois Ehlert, a simple but charming book about growing flowers in every color of the rainbow. Before reading, however, you should be prepared: vibrantly illustrated with Ms. Ehlert’s trademark collages, “Planting a Rainbow” is an inspiring introduction to gardening for little listeners who may start making plans for you to help them create their own rainbow.rainbow
From the opening line (“Every year Mom and I plant a rainbow”) I expect little ones will be hooked; planting your very own rainbow?!? Awesome! Ms. Ehlert then walks readers through the year-long process. There are bulbs to be planted in the fall…including tulips, tigerlily, hyacinth, and crocus. There are seeds to be ordered during the winter and sown in spring…including zinnia, aster, morning glory, and cornflower. And, while you wait for those to sprout, there are seedlings to be purchased at the nursery to be transplanted in your garden…including poppy, delphinium, roses, and carnations. With sunshine and proper care, eventually you earn the payoff: all summer long, there are flowers to be picked to make rainbow after rainbow!
We had fun reading this book together. I particularly enjoyed reading out some of the more interesting flower names (delphinium…hyachinth…zinnia…I’m easily entertained). If you are not familiar with the pronunciations, you may be able to find a video dramatization online – we were able to access one through our local library’s Web site.
“Planting a Rainbow” can be a quick read, but it’s exactly the kind of book that little ones will want to pick up later and read to themselves if it’s left within reach!

Day 130 – Planting the Wild Garden

In keeping with our May theme of flowers and pollinators this evening, we read “Planting the Wild Garden” by Kathryn O. Galbraith and illustrated by Wendy Anderson Halperin. It’s really quite a good story about all the ways in which wild seeds are spread about the “wild meadow garden” of the world around us, including several of, what were for me, revelations about some of the ways in which seeds might be spread. It was one more beautifully illustrated example of natural world “info-tainment” for our Storybook Year.

wildThe book begins with a farmer and her son planting seeds in the garden, but reminds us that “many seeds (in the wild meadow) are planted too, but not by farmers’ hands.” There is, of course, the wind blowing seeds far from home (“oooooo-whishhh”), and goldfinches (“per–chik-o-ree!”) who knock seeds from plants when they land…or eat them and poop them out later. The Scotch broom pops seeds into the air from pods, rain knocks seeds loose, streams carry them, squirrels bury acorns – some of which are lost and grow into great oaks, and several different kinds of animals may carry them in their fur as they amble or skitter through the meadow. And then, of course, there are people who (“stomp stomp”) pick up seeds on their boots and sweaters or simply blow them free while making wishes on dandelions. Everyone – animal and human alike – work together to keep the wild meadow garden flourishing.

Ms. Galbraith’s language in the book is simple and accessible, and the repeated use of onomatopoeia adds entertainment value to the read-aloud experience. We also really enjoyed the illustrations which are laid out almost like a collage or gallery on several pages – showing various stages of the process described in the writing. My favorite picture was the rabbit gnawing on some tall grass…as a fox watches in the background. This was a lot of fun to read and share, and the book fit perfectly with our May themes.