Tag Archives: infotainment

Day 154 – From Seed to Plant

For June 2, we read another book from that prolific purveyor of “infotainment”: Gail Gibbons. “From Seed to Plant” was actually left over from our May theme of seeds and planting – but better late than never! Today’s selection, in true Gail Gibbons fashion, is full of colorful and informative illustrations that help to explain a real-life subject in an engaging way that pulls little listeners right in.

seed to plantIn “From Seed to Plant”, Ms. Gibbons introduces readers to a wide variety of seeds and to some of the flowers that grow from those seeds. There are informative drawings of plant anatomy and examples of the different and innovative ways in which seeds have adapted in order to travel from their source – such as being carried by squirrels, attaching themselves to someone’s pant leg, or floating on the wind. Aspiring gardeners will be inspired by Ms. Gibbon’s explanation of how seeds sprout into new plants, and her “From Seed to Plant” project for growing your own bean plant.

Once again, we turned to Ms. Gibbons for an entertaining and educational “real-world” picture book, and once again she came through with flying colors! Thank you, Ms. Gibbons.

Day 138 – Did a Dinosaur Drink This Water?

In keeping with our seasonal theme, tonight it was water cycle time again. This evening’s book, “Did a Dinosaur Drink This Water?” by Robert E. Wells, was another great example of Storybook Year “info-tainment”: an engaging and accessible picture book that sheds a little more light on how the world really works. Laid out much more like a comic book than a science text, Mr. Wells’ book grabs your attention with an intriguing premise and then imparts a lot of great information about the water cycle and about conservation. It’s a message that would have fit quite well with Earth Day just two days ago, but we enjoyed it just as much today nevertheless.dino water

Now, I’m a sucker for a good (or even a mediocre) dinosaur storybook – but this particular volume isn’t really about dinosaurs. In truth, Mr Wells spends about one page talking about my favorite prehistoric creatures – but the book was entertaining enough that the dearth of dino-discussion didn’t bother me. The question on the cover actually refers to the fact that the Earth recycles water – meaning that the same water molecules we have today have been on the planet for millions and millions of years. It’s a fascinating concept to ponder.

The book follows two children who I presume are a brother and sister, travelling around the globe in what looks like an oversized, glass-domed drone. They stop along the way and learn about the water cycle, the way the earth recycles and cleans water (evaporation, running over rocks in streams, seeping through the soil to underground aquifers), the way that people use the movement of water from river to sea to help generate electricity, and plenty of other great facts. The message about conservation comes right at the end and is presented as a set of common-sense suggestions for using water mindfully.

With pages full of colorful and active illustrations, plenty of great knowledge about the real world, and a flow to the pictures that draws your eye around each page, this is a great book to read aloud or to have laying around for aspiring readers to pick up and peruse on their own.


Day 100 – Water is Water: A Book About the Water Cycle

If you have you been looking for some fact-based picture books that help to explain the world around you to your children, while also providing enough entertainment to keep their attention from beginning to end, you’ve come to the right place! We are thrilled whenever we can find books that fill this need, and we like to fit as many into our reading list as possible. For the month of April one of our “real world” themes is the water cycle – in honor of the April showers for which this month is known (in the Northern Hemisphere, at least). Saturday’s selection, “Water is Water” by Miranda Paul and Jason Chin, is a lovely introduction to the water cycle, with lush, playful illustrations and poetic prose that makes for an entertaining read-aloud experience.water is water
The book follows a brother and sister as they and their friends experience the various forms that water can take throughout the year…steam, clouds, rain, ice, snow, etc. The changing seasons are beautifully illustrated with a backdrop that made me wish for a country house for our girls; nearly every two page spread presents a joyful scene of children playing outdoors and enjoying nature’s beauty to the fullest. The illustrations alone make me thankful to have this book in our library. The words are spare but they have a lyrical cadence with just the right amount of repetition to keep reader and listener alike engaged from beginning to end. I particularly liked the repeated use of the word “unless” to lead from one page to the next: “water is water, unless…it heats up…” in which case it is steam, or “fog is fog, unless…it falls down…” in which case it is rain, etc.
 
The last few pages provide additional detail to explain the various stages of the water cycle, along with some interesting numbers about water, like the fact that oceans hold 96.5% of all the water in the world, while 99% of the fresh water in the world is trapped as ice or snow or is hidden in underwater reservoirs. If I understood them correctly, that means that if you combine all the fresh-water lakes in the world, you would have collected no more than 0.04% of all the water on the Earth. I don’t know if that impresses anyone else, but it seems pretty amazing to me. If you are standing on the shore of one of the Great Lakes (for example) and all you can see is water, it must be mind-boggling to imagine that all that water is still only a tiny, tiny fraction of the world’s fresh water.
 
But I digress. “Water is Water” is another delightful picture book that happens to also be full of great information about how the real world works – and it conveys and captures a true sense of joy about being out in nature. It may also be of note for some parents that the brother and sister are biracial –  I didn’t notice it until I read another review of the book, but for some readers that could add valuable color to an already charming book.